Anonymous – Internet Group

Anonymous (used as a mass noun) is a group, spread through the Internet, initiating active civil disobedience, while attempting to maintain anonymity. Originating in 2003 on the imageboard 4chan, the term refers to the concept of many online community users simultaneously existing as an anarchic, chaotic, global brain. It is also generally considered to be a blanket term for members of certain Internet subcultures, a way to refer to the actions of people in an environment where their actual identities are not known.

In its early form, the concept has been adopted by a decentralized online community acting anonymously in a coordinated manner, usually toward a loosely self-agreed goal, and primarily focused on entertainment. Beginning with 2008, the Anonymous collective has become increasingly associated with collaborative, international hacktivism, undertaking protests and other actions, often with the goal of promoting internet freedom and freedom of speech. Actions credited to “Anonymous” are undertaken by unidentified individuals who apply the Anonymous label to themselves as attribution.

After a series of controversial, widely-publicized protests and distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks by Anonymous in 2008, incidents linked to its cadre members have increased. In consideration of its capabilities, Anonymous has been posited by CNN to be one of the three major successors to WikiLeaks.

Activists from the internet group Anonymous encouraged its followers to take part in the protests, calling protesters to “flood lower Manhattan, set up tents, kitchens, peaceful barricades and occupy Wall Street.” Other groups began to join in the organization of the protest, including the internet group, Hacktivists Anonymous, the U.S. Day of Rage, and the NYC General Assembly, the governing body of the Occupy Wall Street group.

Source of text is Wikipedia

Note: Since the Occupy Movement and Occupy Wall Street were founded on the principles of democracy and are leaderless in organization, no one person speaks for the group completely in their individual commentaries or actions. In a democracy we have the right to disagree with our neighbors nonviolently, and speak our minds publicly, each holding up our own wisdom and prospective with which each other person can choose to agree with or challege. This is the manner in which democratic societies communicate, through a give and take. Since membership in Occupy is open or inclusive, its members carry no cards, therefore support for the movement can only be expressed with words and through our individual actions.

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