Chris Hedges – Journalist

Christopher Lynn Hedges (born September 18, 1956) is an American journalist, author, and war correspondent, specializing in American and Middle Eastern politics and societies. His most recent book is The World As It Is (2011).

Hedges is also known as the best-selling author of War Is a Force That Gives Us Meaning(2002), which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction. A quotation from the book was used as the opening title quotation in the critically acclaimed and Academy Award-winning 2009 film, The Hurt Locker. The quotation reads: “The rush of battle is often a potent and lethal addiction, for war is a drug.”

Chris Hedges is currently a senior fellow at The Nation Institute in New York City.[He spent nearly two decades as a foreign correspondent in Central America, the Middle EastAfricaand the Balkans. He has reported from more than fifty countries, and has worked for The Christian Science MonitorNational Public RadioThe Dallas Morning News, and The New York Times, where he was a foreign correspondent for fifteen years (1990–2005).

In 2002, Hedges was part of the team of reporters at The New York Times awarded thePulitzer Prize for the paper’s coverage of global terrorism. He also received in 2002 the Amnesty International Global Award for Human Rights Journalism. He has taught at Columbia UniversityNew York UniversityPrinceton University and The University of Toronto. He writes a weekly column on Mondays for Truthdig and authored what the New York Times described as “a call to arms” for the first issue of The Occupied Wall Street Journal, the newspaper giving voice to The Occupy Wall Street protests in Zuccotti Park (re-named Liberty Square by the occupation), New York City.

Source of text is Wikipedia

Note: Since the Occupy Movement and Occupy Wall Street were founded on the principles of democracy and are leaderless in organization, no one person speaks for the group completely in their individual commentaries or actions. In a democracy we have the right to disagree with our neighbors nonviolently, and speak our minds publicly, each holding up our own wisdom and prospective with which each other person can choose to agree with or challege. This is the manner in which democratic societies communicate, through a give and take. Since membership in Occupy is open or inclusive, its members carry no cards, therefore support for the movement can only be expressed with words and through our individual actions.

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: